History of Arbitration in Switzerland
Arbitration has been a preferred method of dispute resolution in Switzerland since the Middle Ages. Switzerland became a centre for international dispute settlement after the Congress of Vienna in 1815 officially recognized its neutrality in international conflicts.

1866

First modern commercial arbitration conducted by the Geneva Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Services

1869

First commercial arbitration rules published in Switzerland by the Basel Chamber of Commerce (as it was known back then)

1872

The Alabama Case: the most famous international arbitration in diplomatic history, held in Geneva between Great Britain and the United States

1911

The Zurich Chamber of Commerce establishes a Commercial Arbitration Court

1974

The Swiss Arbitration Association ASA is founded

1989

The Swiss Private International Law Act enters into force, including its liberal Chapter 12 on international arbitration, which is a major game changer

2004

Six Swiss chambers of commerce join forces and adopt the Swiss Rules of International Arbitration, based on the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules, with a firm but light institutional framework (revised 2012 and 2021)

2007

Seven Swiss chambers of commerce adopt the Swiss Rules of Commercial Mediation (revised as Swiss Rules of Mediation in 2019)

2008

The seven chambers of commerce create the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution (SCAI)

2011

Entry into force of the Swiss Code of Civil Procedure with Part 3 on domestic arbitration

2020

The Swiss Parliament adopts a light revision of Chapter 12 of the Swiss Private International Law Act, providing continuity while confirming and deepening the support of international arbitration

2020

SCAI adopts the Rules of Mediation Procedure for Financial Services Disputes, based on the Swiss Financial Services Act

2021

ASA creates Swiss Arbitration, which brings together under one common platform the main actors of commercial arbitration in Switzerland

2021

SCAI becomes the Swiss Arbitration Centre Ltd., with ASA as main shareholder joining forces with the seven Swiss chambers of commerce